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Topic: Smedley Butler caused Wall Street's first coup to fail in 1933

At a time where Wall Street is facing increasing resistance it seems Smedley Butler should certainly be listed here - this is from an excellent blog by the redpillguy: http://rabbit-hole-journey.blogspot.com … chive.html

One of the biggest events of the 20th century in the Memory Hole, was the attempted military coup against the civilian government of the USA, in the 1930's, when FDR was president. I'll bet most of you haven't heard of it. If such a military coup attempt happened, surely it would be big in the history books!

Smedley Butler was the most decorated Marine Major General at the time. A group of people in government and big business plotted an overthrow of the civilian government. He was recruited to lead the military, chosen because of his popularity among his men. He played along until the last minute, then exposed the plot.
http://www.damninteresting.com/?p=883
What followed was a whitewash. The media ignored it, and the one person who could corroborate his story died mysteriously.

Smedley Butler was a true patriot. Today, few people have even heard of him. Why are he and the "Business Plot" not well known?

From Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_P … iness_Plot:

    These reasons were proposed to explain why the Business Plot did not become a cause célèbre:

    The story embarrassed politically influential business people, who felt it best to deflect attention from themselves.

    In 1934, newspapers were controlled by an élite — according to then-Interior Secretary Harold L. Ickes, 82 per cent of daily newspapers monopolized their communities; the media down-played Gen. Butler's testimony to protect the interests of advertisers and their owners.

    Some of President Roosevelt's advisers were plotters, and downplayed the matter, avoiding exposure.


If in 1934, newspapers were controlled by the elite, what more today that they've had more time to consolidate their power? Today, 5 Corporations own the mass media.

There is one more reason I believe that Smedley Butler is ignored in mainstream history. It's because he wrote the book War is a Racket. In this book, he said that the U.S. Military is the attack dog of Wall St.

    "I spent 33 years and four months in active military service and during that period I spent most of my time as a high class muscle man for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism. I helped make Mexico and especially Tampico safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street. I helped purify Nicaragua for the International Banking House of Brown Brothers in 1902-1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for the American sugar interests in 1916. I helped make Honduras right for the American fruit companies in 1903. In China in 1927 I helped see to it that Standard Oil went on its way unmolested. Looking back on it, I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to operate his racket in three districts. I operated on three continents."

Today, the US Military is still the attack dog of Wall Street. In addition, funding the military with taxpayer money means immense profits for the military suppliers. Never-ending wars such as the Vietnam war, and the Iraq War, are not meant to be won, but to be waged...